Monthly Archives: January 2014

Occupational Therapy for Older People

 

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What is occupational therapy?

  •  Occupational therapists (OTs) aim to enable people to make the most of their abilities to perform daily activities and remain as independent as possible
  • OTs work with people who have physical and/or mental health problems
  • OTs work in a range of health care settings, as well as in the community

 

When would my ageing parent see an occupational therapist?

  • If your parent is admitted to hospital, an OT should assess them before they are discharged.
  • This assessment will normally include agreeing goals with the patient and their carer to  develop a patient-specific treatment programme, aimed at  achieving maximum functional ability once they leave hospital
  • Your parent will receive a report outlining some recommendations, which may include the provision of adaptive, or assistive equipment for use at home
  • This assistance might be provided by the hospital, your parent’s local council, or will need to be purchased privately. This will depend on local policies in their area

 

How can occupational therapy help my ageing parent?

Below are some examples of how an OT may work with an older person to help them keep active and perform their daily routines:

  • Teach a person with arthritis to protect the joints and conserve energy
  • Help a person with limited range of movement to do stretching exercises and use  adaptive equipment, such as a sponge with a long handle
  • Train a person with an amputation to put a prosthesis on and off
  • Help a person with low vision adapt the environment to avoid glare and increase colour contrast
  • Help a person with memory impairment to organize by labeling drawers and cabinets

Taken from http://www.myageingparent.com The website is a great source of information  for Occupational Therapy with older people, also including how OT’s help older people with  pain management and  Dementia 

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