Occupational Therapy for Older People

 

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What is occupational therapy?

  •  Occupational therapists (OTs) aim to enable people to make the most of their abilities to perform daily activities and remain as independent as possible
  • OTs work with people who have physical and/or mental health problems
  • OTs work in a range of health care settings, as well as in the community

 

When would my ageing parent see an occupational therapist?

  • If your parent is admitted to hospital, an OT should assess them before they are discharged.
  • This assessment will normally include agreeing goals with the patient and their carer to  develop a patient-specific treatment programme, aimed at  achieving maximum functional ability once they leave hospital
  • Your parent will receive a report outlining some recommendations, which may include the provision of adaptive, or assistive equipment for use at home
  • This assistance might be provided by the hospital, your parent’s local council, or will need to be purchased privately. This will depend on local policies in their area

 

How can occupational therapy help my ageing parent?

Below are some examples of how an OT may work with an older person to help them keep active and perform their daily routines:

  • Teach a person with arthritis to protect the joints and conserve energy
  • Help a person with limited range of movement to do stretching exercises and use  adaptive equipment, such as a sponge with a long handle
  • Train a person with an amputation to put a prosthesis on and off
  • Help a person with low vision adapt the environment to avoid glare and increase colour contrast
  • Help a person with memory impairment to organize by labeling drawers and cabinets

Taken from http://www.myageingparent.com The website is a great source of information  for Occupational Therapy with older people, also including how OT’s help older people with  pain management and  Dementia 

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World Occupational Therapy Day ~ A day in the life of an Occupational Therapist

As today is World Occupational Therapy day…

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I would like to share this feature from The Guardian, ‘A day in the life of a specialist Occupational Therapist’ .  I would like to also call upon some OT’s or student OT’s who would be willing to contribute to my blog by promoting OT and talking about a day in their life.  I would like to try and demonstrate the diversity of work carried out in this wonderful field.

I plan to do ‘ a day in the life of a student OT’ myself in the near future and share some of my experience in a role emerging placement working with ex street sleepers.

Now here is the feature from The Guardian about  Fran Hill who travels all over Hampshire for South Coast Fatigue helping clients who are affected by chronic fatigue syndrome ..

Gemini  Xx

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Click the pic for the article ”a day in the life of ..a specialist Occupational Therapist”

World Occupational Therapy Day 27th October 2013

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How can I help? – click this pic!

Can you contribute to this world day of service for World OT Day?

From volunteering at a homeless shelter to an afternoon’s companionship to a person with cancer, if you think it might be service, it probably is! Click on the picture above to find out how you can help.

Stop the MS lottery

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Click here to find out more and join the campaign to stop the MS lottery

Alarming numbers of people with MS in the UK are facing a lottery when it comes to accessing the care and support they need to manage their condition

Here are some facts about MS treatment

  • Six out of Ten eligible people do not take disease modifying treatments (DMT’s)

  • If you have MS and live in Northern Ireland you are more than twice as likely to be taking a DMT than if you live in Wales.

  •  Across Europe, only Poland and Romania have a smaller proportion of people with MS taking DMTs.

  • Access to specialists also plays a key role – those with access to an MS nurse or neurologist are more than twice as likely to be taking a DMT.

People  with MS in the UK should have access to  medicines among the best in Europe, not the worst, and we need to to see an end to the current postcode – and passport – lottery of access.

To do this the MS society are calling on governments across the UK to ensure every person with MS has a personalised treatment , care and support plan, with two comprehensive reviews each year.

“When it comes to MS drug prescription rates, the UK ranks 25th out of 27 European countries. Given the relative wealth of the UK this is simply unacceptable.” MS society

 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month October 2013

This month is Breast Cancer awareness month…

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Please find below some facts, figures and useful links which will hopefully help raise awareness for this disease which is increasing in the developing world.  Please feel free to re blog and help to increase awareness of breast cancer.

 

Breast cancer is the top cancer in women both in the developed and the developing world. The incidence of breast cancer is increasing in the developing world due to increase life expectancy, increase urbanization and adoption of western lifestyles. Although some risk reduction might be achieved with prevention, these strategies cannot eliminate the majority of breast cancers that develop in low- and middle-income countries where breast cancer is diagnosed in very late stages. Therefore, early detection in order to improve breast cancer outcome and survival remains the cornerstone of breast cancer control. (World Health Organization) 

There are about 1.38 million new cases and 458 000 deaths from breast cancer each year (IARC Globocan, 2008). 

Breast cancer statistics

  • Breast cancer rates in England have increased by 90% since records began in 1971.
  • One in 8 women in the UK will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives.
  • In 2009 more than 48,400 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK – around 133 women a day. Around 370 men were diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the UK – 31% of cancers diagnosed in women are breast cancer.
  • Around 12,000 women in the UK die from breast cancer each year.
  • Since peaking in the late 1980s, breast cancer death rates have fallen by almost 40% in the UK.

Raising awareness 

When breast cancer and its treatment overshadow everything, we see the woman underneath. Breast Cancer Care is the only UK-wide charity dedicated to providing emotional and practical support for anyone affected by breast cancer. We campaign for better support and care and promote the importance of early detection, involving people with breast cancer in all that we do. (Breast Cancer Care Charity)  

Please click on the image/logo below for more valuable information about breast cancer from the charity..  

the breast cancer
support charity

Votes that count ~ 2013

The Vote that Counts is a fantastic online initiative which will see £100,000 being distributed across six Great British charities – chosen by you….I have voted for my favorite charity..have you?

To vote and see which charities are in the lead visit …http://votethatcounts.org/

The boy who stood up to Syrian Injustice

A story of Muhammad who is just one of over one million Syrian child refugees abroad, according to the United Nations. Like most of them, he doesn’t attend school. Children like him, uneducated and unskilled, will constitute a Syrian lost generation.

Neda Radwan, a psychologist for the International Rescue Committee, counsels the refugees and sees constant signs of survivor torment.

“I’ve tried art therapy with the children,” she said. “They refuse to draw anything but dead bodies.” – The New York Times, Sunday Review

Please click on the image below for the full article from The New York Times

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The boy who stood up to Syrian Injustice

So much injustice in this world makes one realize how lucky we are to have the luxury of the protection of our human rights no matter how messed up we think our countries are at times.

Gemini