Tag Archives: Health

International Women’s Day – Warning Signs for Women’s Cancers

Please accept my apologies for being a couple of days late for International Women’s Day . I have been very busy with Uni deadlines this weekend, but wanted to post something to raise awareness for women’s health. This is a great article from ‘Defeat Cancer’ – thank you.

Gem X

Defeat Cancer

 

Wishing all women good health on International Women’s Day!

 To ensure good health, women need to take some precautions. Now let’s examine  important warning signals for women’s cancers.

 Rachel, one of the secretaries of the hospital, came crying to me that both her breasts become extremely painful particularly before menstrual periods.  She was woried that she has cancer as one of her relatives was recently diagnosed.This is quite common and  is due to hormonal changes along with menstrual cycle.  The breasts become heavy,  tender and the pain fully disappears after the periods start.  This is not to be worried about as a sign of malignancy.

A.Breast Cancer

Let me give some practical information on early detection of breast cancer.

Breast Lump :    Classically a painless lump in breast like a buried pea or sometimes larger like a grape, is one of the important signs of breast cancer. It…

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Occupational Therapy for Older People

 

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What is occupational therapy?

  •  Occupational therapists (OTs) aim to enable people to make the most of their abilities to perform daily activities and remain as independent as possible
  • OTs work with people who have physical and/or mental health problems
  • OTs work in a range of health care settings, as well as in the community

 

When would my ageing parent see an occupational therapist?

  • If your parent is admitted to hospital, an OT should assess them before they are discharged.
  • This assessment will normally include agreeing goals with the patient and their carer to  develop a patient-specific treatment programme, aimed at  achieving maximum functional ability once they leave hospital
  • Your parent will receive a report outlining some recommendations, which may include the provision of adaptive, or assistive equipment for use at home
  • This assistance might be provided by the hospital, your parent’s local council, or will need to be purchased privately. This will depend on local policies in their area

 

How can occupational therapy help my ageing parent?

Below are some examples of how an OT may work with an older person to help them keep active and perform their daily routines:

  • Teach a person with arthritis to protect the joints and conserve energy
  • Help a person with limited range of movement to do stretching exercises and use  adaptive equipment, such as a sponge with a long handle
  • Train a person with an amputation to put a prosthesis on and off
  • Help a person with low vision adapt the environment to avoid glare and increase colour contrast
  • Help a person with memory impairment to organize by labeling drawers and cabinets

Taken from http://www.myageingparent.com The website is a great source of information  for Occupational Therapy with older people, also including how OT’s help older people with  pain management and  Dementia 

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World Occupational Therapy Day ~ A day in the life of an Occupational Therapist

As today is World Occupational Therapy day…

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I would like to share this feature from The Guardian, ‘A day in the life of a specialist Occupational Therapist’ .  I would like to also call upon some OT’s or student OT’s who would be willing to contribute to my blog by promoting OT and talking about a day in their life.  I would like to try and demonstrate the diversity of work carried out in this wonderful field.

I plan to do ‘ a day in the life of a student OT’ myself in the near future and share some of my experience in a role emerging placement working with ex street sleepers.

Now here is the feature from The Guardian about  Fran Hill who travels all over Hampshire for South Coast Fatigue helping clients who are affected by chronic fatigue syndrome ..

Gemini  Xx

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Click the pic for the article ”a day in the life of ..a specialist Occupational Therapist”

Stop the MS lottery

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Click here to find out more and join the campaign to stop the MS lottery

Alarming numbers of people with MS in the UK are facing a lottery when it comes to accessing the care and support they need to manage their condition

Here are some facts about MS treatment

  • Six out of Ten eligible people do not take disease modifying treatments (DMT’s)

  • If you have MS and live in Northern Ireland you are more than twice as likely to be taking a DMT than if you live in Wales.

  •  Across Europe, only Poland and Romania have a smaller proportion of people with MS taking DMTs.

  • Access to specialists also plays a key role – those with access to an MS nurse or neurologist are more than twice as likely to be taking a DMT.

People  with MS in the UK should have access to  medicines among the best in Europe, not the worst, and we need to to see an end to the current postcode – and passport – lottery of access.

To do this the MS society are calling on governments across the UK to ensure every person with MS has a personalised treatment , care and support plan, with two comprehensive reviews each year.

“When it comes to MS drug prescription rates, the UK ranks 25th out of 27 European countries. Given the relative wealth of the UK this is simply unacceptable.” MS society

 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month October 2013

This month is Breast Cancer awareness month…

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Please find below some facts, figures and useful links which will hopefully help raise awareness for this disease which is increasing in the developing world.  Please feel free to re blog and help to increase awareness of breast cancer.

 

Breast cancer is the top cancer in women both in the developed and the developing world. The incidence of breast cancer is increasing in the developing world due to increase life expectancy, increase urbanization and adoption of western lifestyles. Although some risk reduction might be achieved with prevention, these strategies cannot eliminate the majority of breast cancers that develop in low- and middle-income countries where breast cancer is diagnosed in very late stages. Therefore, early detection in order to improve breast cancer outcome and survival remains the cornerstone of breast cancer control. (World Health Organization) 

There are about 1.38 million new cases and 458 000 deaths from breast cancer each year (IARC Globocan, 2008). 

Breast cancer statistics

  • Breast cancer rates in England have increased by 90% since records began in 1971.
  • One in 8 women in the UK will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives.
  • In 2009 more than 48,400 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK – around 133 women a day. Around 370 men were diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the UK – 31% of cancers diagnosed in women are breast cancer.
  • Around 12,000 women in the UK die from breast cancer each year.
  • Since peaking in the late 1980s, breast cancer death rates have fallen by almost 40% in the UK.

Raising awareness 

When breast cancer and its treatment overshadow everything, we see the woman underneath. Breast Cancer Care is the only UK-wide charity dedicated to providing emotional and practical support for anyone affected by breast cancer. We campaign for better support and care and promote the importance of early detection, involving people with breast cancer in all that we do. (Breast Cancer Care Charity)  

Please click on the image/logo below for more valuable information about breast cancer from the charity..  

the breast cancer
support charity

Autism ~ Therapy, acceptance and community

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”Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with, and relates to, other people. It also affects how they make sense of the world around them.

It is a spectrum condition, which means that, while all people with autism share certain difficulties, their condition will affect them in different ways. Some people with autism are able to live relatively independent lives but others may have accompanying learning disabilities and need a lifetime of specialist support. People with autism may also experience over- or under-sensitivity to sounds, touch, tastes, smells, light or colours.

Asperger syndrome is a form of autism. People with Asperger syndrome are often of average or above average intelligence. They have fewer problems with speech but may still have difficulties with understanding and processing language.” – The National Autistic Society.

I wanted to share this article about young autistic adults and parents finding acceptance and community at unique Autism Movement Therapy workshop. If you have spent any time with autistic adults or children you will know how important the little breakthroughs in communication are for these people and their loved ones. Please click on the picture below for the very interesting and informative article..

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click the pic for the article. Picture from ‘The art of autism’

Don’t limit me!

What an amazing and articulate girl! I don’t think anyone could get the message across any better.  A fantastic lesson for anyone working with Learning Disabilities.

I think this should be shown in lectures at all OT teaching Universities.

I myself had a fantastic placement experience working with with learning disabilities and saw so much potential, enthusiasm and determination to learn with such wonderful personalities and character from people with Downs Syndrome.

Gemini